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Travel Guide for Devils Tower National Monument

Devils Tower National Monument is located in northeastern Wyoming, rising 1,267 feet above the Belle Fourche River, and standing 867 feet from summit to base.

It is a striking geologic wonder considered sacred by many Native American tribes. Its rich history and natural beauty make it a top travel destination.

Devils Tower is a butte, possibly laccolithic, composed of igneous rock in the Bear Lodge Ranger District of the Black Hills, near Hulett and Sundance in Crook County.

Devils Tower National Monument entrance area
Devils Tower National Monument entrance area

Devils Tower has long been a a popular locale, attracting people and capturing their imaginations since prehistoric times. Today, it continues to hold many meanings for people including American Indians, local ranchers, rock climbers, and thousands of visitors.

Devils Tower was the first United States national monument, established on September 24, 1906, by President Theodore Roosevelt. The monument's boundary encloses an area of 1,347 acres. Annually, about 400,000 people visit the monument.

The 1977 movie Close Encounters of the Third Kind used Devils Tower as a plot element and as the location of its climactic scenes. The movie resulted in a large increase in visitors and climbers to the monument.

Surrounding Country

Known as Devils Tower Country, the towns in the area surrounding Devils Tower National Monument in northeast Wyoming are rich with history and outdoor gems. Bordered by the Bighorn Mountains to the west, South Dakota to the east, Montana to the north and the Thunder Basin National Grassland to the south, this is a unique part of the state with plenty to offer.

Nearby cities and towns include Aladdin, Beulah, Hulett, Moorcroft, Pine Haven and Sundance.

We have visited Devils Tower on our journeys to Wyoming ... highly recommended!

Devils Tower, standing 867 feet from summit to base
Devils Tower, standing 867 feet from summit to base

 

Directions to the Monument

Devils Tower National Monument is accessed by a single road, Wyoming Hwy 24, and located 9 miles south of Hulett, Wyoming.

The most common route to the Tower is from Interstate 90, taking US Highway 14 from Moorcroft, WY (exit 153 if approaching from the west) or US Hwy 14 from Sundance, WY (exit 185 if approaching from the east).

Wyoming Hwy 24 intersects US Hwy 14 six miles south of the Tower at what is known as "Devils Tower Junction." The Tower can also be reached from the north via WY Hwy 24 and/or 112 after passing through Hulett, WY.

Visitor Center

Devils Tower National Monument has one visitor center, completed in 1935 with the help of the Civilian Conservation Corps. It was constructed from ponderosa pine logs and other local materials, and was originally designed as an administration building for the park.

Today, this structure serves as the primary contact station for visitors. Inside you can find park staff, the Devils Tower Natural History Association Bookstore, and exhibits which explain the natural and cultural history of the park.

 Devils Tower Visitor Center
Devils Tower National Monument Visitor Center
Devils Tower National Monument
P. O Box 10
Devils Tower, WY 82714
Phone 307.467.5283 x635
Website of Devils Tower National Monument

Map of Devils Tower National Monument

Shown to the right is a map of Devils Tower National Monument, courtesy of the National Park Service.

click the image to view Devils Tower maps at NPS

Map of Devils Tower National Monument ... click to view detailed maps at the National Park Service website



Devils Tower, an important landmark for Plains Indian tribes
Devils Tower, an important landmark for Plains Indian tribes

 

Things to Do at Devils Tower

Climbers on Devils Tower National Monument
Climbers on Devils Tower National Monument

Visitors to Devils Tower enjoy hiking, climbing, stargazing and other outdoor activities.

Hundreds of climbers scale the sheer rock walls of Devils Tower each summer. The most common route is the Durrance Route, but there are many established and documented climbing routes covering every side of the tower, ascending the various vertical cracks and columns of the rock.

The difficulty of these routes range from relatively easy to some of the most challenging in the world. All climbers are required to register with a park ranger before and after attempting a climb. No overnight camping at the summit is allowed; climbers return to base on the same day they ascend.

A voluntary closure is in effect each June to respect American Indian cultural values associated with the Tower. This applies to the entire zone inside of the paved Tower Trail loop and includes climbing, rock scrambling, and hiking off trail. Visitors are encouraged to stay on trail.

Specific climbing routes on the Tower are also seasonably closed to protect nesting falcons. The closure may be modified throughout the spring based on nesting behavior.

A Sacred Place

The Tower is sacred to several Plains tribes, including the Lakota, Cheyenne and Kiowa.

This sign reads ... "The tower is held sacred by many American Indians and highly regarded by other peoples. Respect this place by staying on trails"

Devils Tower is sacred to several Plains tribes, including the Lakota, Cheyenne and Kiowa.

 

The grandeur and majesty of Devils Tower
The grandeur and majesty of Devils Tower

 

 

Lodging Options Near Devils Tower

Hotels and lodging near Devils Tower ... TripAdvisor reviews, photos, reservations

TripAdvisor Reviews

Devils Tower Visitor Guide at TripAdvisor

 

More Information about Devils Tower

Website of Devils Tower National Monument

 

Travel Wyoming: Devils Tower

 

Devils Tower Country

 

Devils Tower Trading Post

 

Devils Tower Visitor Guide at TripAdvisor